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Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi), 2024 Vol.133 No.2

2024 Vol.133 No.2

Landscape of the Upper Reaches of the Orkhon River, Khangai Mtns., Mongolia

Readers might imagine that huge deserts and extensive sheep-filled grasslands are typical landscapes of Mongolia; however, it is a mountainous country. To the north and west there are wild, non-vegetated hills and rugged ridges, with high snow-covered peaks reminiscent of the European Alps. The Khangai mountains in central Mongolia, extending ca. 1000 km in length and ca. 200 km crosswise, form a dominant massif composed mostly of Paleozoic orogenic products, such as accretionary complexes, volcanics/granitoids, blueschists, and ophiolites. The cover photo shows a typical landscape of the mid-Khangai mountains, along the upper reaches of the Orkhon River. The exposed basement rocks are components of the Devonian accretionary complex, e.g., bedded chert: a section of ancient deep-sea floor from the Paleo-Asian Ocean. From a prominent chert ridge, we can clearly observe well-preserved natural landforms, such as a sedimentary fan and braided river system, free from obstacles (vegetation and human artefacts), with nomadic gels (temporary tent-like structures) providing scale. The flat plane on the opposite riverbank is not a river terrace but a flow surface of Quaternary flood basalt. Japanese readers may have read the popular historic novel Pale Wolf by Yasushi Inoue, based on the ancient document The Secret History of the Mongols, which tells the life story of Genghis Khan. The Orkhon River appears often in this novel, reminding us of the frequent long journeys he made across this river with his warriors and family. The natural landscape appears not to have changed much in the millennium since the time of Genghis Khan.


(Photograph & Explanation: Yukio ISOZAKI)




Review Article

Overview: Distribution, Occurrence, and Origins of Methane Hydrates
 around the Japan Islands

Ryo MATSUMOTO, Akihiro HIRUTA, Takeshi OI,
Yoshihiro KAKIZAKI, Takaya SHIMONO, Naoto ISHIDA,
Mahsa SAEIDI-ORTAKAND, Glen SNYDER, Hitoshi TOMARU,
Akari FUKUDA, Mineo HIROMATSU, Shiro OHKAWA,
Yutaka YANAGIMOTO, Manabu TANAHASHI and Yoshitaka KAKUWA

Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi), 2024, 133(2), 63.

DOI:10.5026/jgeography.133.63

Original Articles

Depth of Pressure Source of Activity at Hakone Volcano:
 From the Viewpoint of Monitoring Volcanic Activity

Masatake HARADA and Akio YOSHIDA

Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi), 2024, 133(2), 91.

DOI:10.5026/jgeography.133.91

Three-dimensional Structure of the Omiya and the Iriyamase Faults
  and Its Formation Process, the Eastern Margin of the Fujikawa-kako Fault Zone,
  the Northwestern Border of the Izu Collision Zone, Central Japan:
  Outcomes of the Multi-line Integrated Seismic Exploration in the Hoshiyama Hills

Tanio ITO, Ken’ichi KANO, Go SATO,
Akira FUJIWARA, Toshiki WATANABE, Motonori HIGASHINAKA,
Susumu ABE, Shintaro ABE, Noriko TSUMURA,
Genjyu YAMAMOTO, Hisoshi SATO, Takaya IWASAKI,
Tetsuya TAKEDA, Tatsuya ISHIYAMA, Kei ODAWARA,
Masatake HARADA and Jiro KOMORI

Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi), 2024, 133(2), 101.

DOI:10.5026/jgeography.133.101

Short Article

Is Precipitation Likely to Occur in the Aso Region in Early Spring (First Week of March)
 Based on Local Traditional Event Known as “Noyaki” (Controlled Burning)?

Kensuke SUZUKI, Hitoshi SAITO and Hiroshi MATSUYAMA

Journal of Geography (Chigaku Zasshi), 2024, 133(2), 129.

DOI:10.5026/jgeography.133.129

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